,

Healthy Mental Health Strategies for Your Loved Ones To Develop

,

Smokey Point Behavioral Hospital Helps Teen Struggling with Thoughts of Suicide

,

February: Teen Dating Violence Awareness Month

February is Teen Dating Violence Awareness Month. As experts in providing specialized mental health treatment, Smokey Point Behavioral Hospital is prepared to take on the challenging task of treating victims of teen dating violence at their facility and through community outreach.

,

Mental Health Awareness: A Guide for 2019

October was recognized as Mental Health Awareness month, but while that has passed us by, the discussion shouldn’t be limited to a single time of the year. It is more important than ever to address this delicate subject and oft-misunderstood mental illness in the light of the Thousand Oaks Shooting, and other prevalent tragedies like […]

,

Sally Anne Schneider Discusses Substance Abuse with K5News

Earlier this week, Smokey Point Behavioral Hospital CEO Sally Anne Schneider, as well as Director of Clinical Services Dr. Stacey Shaw sat down with K5News to discuss a range of topics related to women and alcohol, trauma, associated mental health issues and available treatment. This stems from a recent study published by the Institute for Health Metrics & Evaluation (IHME) at the University of Washington.

The following were reported:

  • Researchers found that from 2007 to 2017, the number of deaths attributable to alcohol in the U.S. increased by 35%.
  • The overall death rate rose 24%
  • Alcohol-related deaths for men rose 29%
  • Alcohol-related deaths for women rose a shocking 85%

Dr. Shaw stated, one of the possible reasons why there was such a significant increase in alcohol-related deaths could be attributed to the shift in “cultural norms”. We are more welcoming to alcohol in our homes or places of work. This shift in our culture could create problems for those who are suffering from addiction, either because it enables them to continue to drink more, or they are simply not aware they have a problem.

Sally Anne Schneider said it best: “If you think you have a problem, and you can’t cut it in half successfully in 3 months, you might have a substance abuse problem”.

Someone may be using addictive substances to numb themselves from other mental health illnesses, such as depression or anxiety. Previously there were fewer effective methods of mental health treatment available and less awareness. That has thankfully changed, and facilities such as Smokey Point Behavioral Hospital are not only trained to provide care to patients in need of mental health treatment, they have designed programs specifically for women, known as the Women’s Connection Program and outpatient programs for substance abuse problems.

The Women’s Connection Program at Smokey Point Behavioral Hospital was designed specifically for women who are in need of mental health care. The inpatient program is geared towards offering a safe & welcoming environment, with the goal of treating depression, anxiety, and any trauma they might have experienced in the past.

If you or a loved one is in need of help overcoming addiction, or in need of any mental health care, please call us at (844) 202-5555 to speak with a mental health care counselor. Smokey Point Behavioral Hospital is proud to help positively impact the lives of those who are in our care.

The full interview with Sally Anne Schneider & Dr. Stacey Shaw is embedded below.

, , ,

Medal of Honor Recipient Visits Troops at Alaskan Military Bases

Medal of Honor recipient Master Sgt. Leroy Petry visited soldiers at Eielson Air Force Base and Fort Wainwright in Fairbanks, Alaska. Petry is the official ambassador and quality control advocate for the Extra Mile Military Care program at Smokey Point Behavioral Hospital, located in Marysville, WA. Petry is currently advocating for mental health services that are available for active military personnel and veterans.

The goal of the Extra Mile Military Care program is to help veteran patients succeed in personal and professional endeavors while overcoming depression, anxiety attacks, substance abuse or PTSD.

During his visit, The Daily Miner, Fairbanks local newspaper chronicled the retired Master Sergeant’s events.

The front-page article detailed the events that earned Petry his Medal of Honor. The following is an excerpt from that article:

“Master Sgt. Leroy Petry is a retired Army Ranger who received the military’s highest honor for grabbing a grenade thrown near him and saving the life of fellow soldiers during a 2008 attack on a Taliban compound in Afghanistan’s Paktia province”.

At Eielson Air Force Base, Petry spoke to over 250 Airmen and civilian employees about the importance of the mental health services that are available for soldiers. He met with the base commander and Air Force clinicians afterward to discuss the resources available to active military and veterans in need of behavioral health services. Petry’s interview at Eielson detailing how he received the Medal of Honor has since gone viral.

Petry also met with members of the Army’s elite MEDEVAC unit at Fort Wainwright and several Gold Star Families afterward at the USO. Gold Star Families are those who have lost loved ones in the line of duty.

Petry’s service dog, Tommy, accompanied him throughout the entire visit. Also visiting Fairbanks was Mr. Randy Kiniecki of US HealthVest, Dr. Stacey Shaw, program director for EMMC, and, Mr. Greg Walker, senior military liaison for EMMC.

MSG Petry (L) and retired Ranger Andy Poncho (R)

Petry concluded his visit by leaving a memorial bouquet of red, white and blue flowers at the Fairbanks Veterans Memorial Park. Retired Army Ranger and resident Andy Poncho assisted Petry.

Petry is also invited to speak at Joint Base Lewis McChord in Washington State and on O’ahu in Hawaii on behalf of Extra Mile Military Care.

, , ,

Medal of Honor Recipient Leroy Petry Discusses Mental Health Treatment for Military

Petry and Army MEDEVAC Team

Retired Master Sergeant Leroy Petry, who was awarded the Medal of Honor in 2011, visited Fairbanks, Alaska on July 25th and 26th. Petry, the official ambassador and quality control advocate for the Extra Mile Military Care program at Smokey Point Behavioral Hospital (Marysville, WA), toured both Fort Wainwright and Eielson Air Force Base during his stay. While visiting, Petry advocated mental health services that are available to both active military personnel and retired veterans.

 

 

While visiting Eielson Air Force Base, Petry spoke twice to an audience of over 250 Airmen and civilian employees. He met with the base commander and with Air Force clinicians afterward.

 

While on a mission in rural Afghanistan in May 2008, Petry saved the lives of two fellow Army Rangers when he grabbed a grenade thrown near them. While attempting to throw the grenade away, it detonated in his right hand.

 

While he may have lost his hand, Petry never gave up fighting. After spending several weeks recovering from his wounds, Petry was fitted with a prosthetic right hand, and re-enlisted in the Army. Petry was deployed again to Afghanistan, where he served until he received the Medal of Honor on July 12th, 2011.

 

Now retired, Petry hopes to help veterans who are experiencing depression or are seeking PTSD treatment after finishing their service.

 

“The world is filled with opportunity.” Petry says, “When you wake up, and you breathe that air into your lungs, and you open your eyes, you have the opportunity to change the world.”

 

Petry also spoke about mental health awareness and how important it is to take care of our veterans. This means taking care of the veteran’s physical wounds and emotional wounds too.

 

An average of 33 American active duty service members or veterans commit suicide daily. It is vital that mental health services are available to those who need to use them.

 

“For a lot of people they have no hope, (they think) no one is going to help them out,” he said. “Plus the stigma of, ‘Oh, if I go get mental health I’ll never be able to own a gun, or I’ll never be able to continue my job, they’ll kick me out, or I’ll never get promoted.’

 

“A lot of what I talk to them about is that to be a well-rounded soldier you’ve got to be mentally, physically and spiritually green. When you started going into the yellow or the red you’re not going to be at your peak performance.”

 

Be sure to watch the video linked below for additional information!